WHAT WILL MAKE YOUR KIDS HAPPIER ? READ ON ….

“One of the luckiest things that can happen to you in life is, I think, to have a happy childhood.” – Agatha Christie

Childhood is a special time ,a time of discovery, play, wonder, and amusement at the world as the child gets the know the world around them. For the parents, this time can bring about a sense of worry, as they seek to ensure the child’s health and happiness.

 

Whether you’re a parent, want-to-be parent, or someone who just loves kids,  read below will provide some great insight into making for a healthier and happier child.

7 (SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN!) TIPS TO MAKE THE LITTLE ONE HAPPIER:

1. GIVE THEM PLENTY OF PLAY TIME

The primary responsibility of a kid is – or at least, should be – to play. Yes, the kid will eventually have homework, extracurricular stuff, and so on; but from toddler to adolescence, they should be given the freedom just to have fun.

Peter Gray, a child psychologist and professor at Boston College, states :

“Children learn the most important lessons in life from other children, not from adults…they cannot learn, or are much are much less likely to learn, in interactions with adults.”

So get them to “go outside and play!”

2. TAKE ARGUMENT AND HEAVY DISCUSSIONS ELSEWHERE

Kid’s brains develop at an extraordinary rate during early childhood. When they see and hear about adult-like problems, and uncertainties, the child’s delicate psychological state can be negatively affected; potentially making them worried and insecure.

Children should not hear stressful conversations from adults – it is most definitely not the time.

3. DON’T COMPARE THEM TO OTHERS

The pressure to succeed make it enticing to instill an early sense of competitiveness – and some adults do so by comparing them to someone else. Sometimes, adults will also point out desirable personality traits in another child, hoping to duplicate them in the other.

Researchers say that such comparative tendencies can adversely affect a child’s confidence and sense of self.

4. TEACH THE BENEFITS OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS

Pointing out the obvious – a child is not very mature. Almost every kid will have spontaneous outbursts of anger, envy, sadness, etc. This behavior presents a good learning opportunity for the adult.

Dr. John Gottman at the University of Washington cites the popular tendency of adults to address a child’s perceived “misbehavior” – their negative emotions – by doling out some punishment. A better way is to acknowledge the behavior by teaching the child that everyone experiences negative emotions, and finding ways to teaching the child how to deal with their emotions constructively.

5. ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR EFFORTS

The child is going to reach the age when he knows that hard work is needed to get ahead. It is important to recognize when the child pushes themselves to accomplish something.

Talking about cognitive tasks during childhood, Dr. Carol S. Dweck at Stanford says:

“Our message to parents is to focus on the process the child engages in, such as trying hard or focusing on the task – what specific things they’re doing rather than ‘you’re so smart, you’re so good at this…what (the adult) does early matters.”

6. VALUE FAMILY TRADITIONS

Having a variety of things that a family does together is a good sign of a stable household; with stability being an important aspect of childhood development.

According to the Child Development Institute, having regular family time induces five main benefits::

  • the child feels important and loved;
  • the child observes positive adult traits;
  • adults can observe and learn more about their child’s weaknesses to guide them better;
  • the child can verbalize their thoughts and feelings
  • the parent and child develop a stronger bond.
7. LET THEM TAKE CHANCES

Children require a certain amount of supervision; yet, adults can overdo it by monitoring their every move. This “overparenting,” is counterproductive to development.

Researchers, in the Journal of Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools, write:

“Does an extreme attentiveness to a child and their imagined needs and issues, encourage parents to reduce their demands on their child, resulting in the child rarely facing adverse situations, learning to cope, and acquiring resilience, maturity , and other essential life skills? The current study raises the disturbing possibility that the answer is yes.”

You should also read  : Strict Mothers Have More Successful Children !!!

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Live happy and plainlive.

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